Critical Illness Definitions

Critical illness cover means insurance which pays out on meeting the policy definition of a specified critical illness.

Insurance companies may not cover all these critical illnesses but if they do, they must meet the standards set out in the Association of British Insurers guide (ABI). Some insurance companies will offer better cover than the ABI definitions as well as covering a wider range of illnesses than those laid out by the ABI. Model ABI Critical Illness Definitions include:

Aviva paid out 93.5% of individual income protection policies in 2012, the insurance provider has revealed.

Aviva protection customers and their families received more than £475m through claims on life insurance, critical illness cover and individual income protection policies in 2012. This equates to more than £1.3 m pounds a day or £902 per minute.

Robert Morrison, chief underwriter for Aviva said: “Our latest figures are great news for all families who have protection or are thinking of taking out cover.

“Almost 14,000 of our customers and their families benefited from payments last year so people can be reassured that we are absolutely committed to paying claims wherever possible.

“This is borne out by our latest claims statistics. We will continue to work with our customers to ensure if they need to make a claim their journey is as quick and straightforward as possible.”

The insurer revealed that it paid out a total £475m in 2012 for Life, Critical Injury and Income Protection claims.

The figures include £324m (up £4m from 2011) paid to the families of life insurance customers who have died or been diagnosed with a terminal illness and over £131m (up £17m from 2011) paid to customers with CI cover. Payments to IP customers totalled almost £15m (up 1.3 m from 2011).

The data also reveals that during 2012 Aviva made payments for 10,880 life insurance claims (up 385 from 2011), 1,716 CI claims (up 148 from 2011) and 1,130 individual IP claims (compared to 1,227 in 2011).

For a personal quotation email us at quotes@parkgate.net with your requirements or give us a call to discuss further.

Two out of three MS sufferers have one thing in common.

They’re women.

MSThere are around 100,000 multiple sclerosis sufferers in the UK1. In fact it’s one of the five most common critical illnesses claimed for2. What’s more, it affects twice as many women as men1.

MS is also very difficult to diagnose.

That’s why many providers use the standard definition from the Association of British Insurers to make decisions on a claim.

But at Bright Grey our definition is better than that and means you don’t have to wait as long for your diagnosis to be confirmed3.

 

65,000

women in the UK have been diagnosed with MS1

 

81%

of the women who claimed for MS were 40 or younger2

1 in 9

of all women’s critical illness claims were for MS2

Talk to Park Gate. We’ll help you identify your individual protection needs and guide you through the various types of cover available to make sure you get the right cover at the right price. 01489 580020 or email info@parkgate.net

 

Sources: 1. www.mssociety.org.uk, May 2012. 2. Bright Grey claims statistics, 1 July – 31 December 2011. 3. This improved definition applies to menu plans with a quote effective date of 28 May 2012 or later.  

Two out of three multiple sclerosis sufferers have one thing in common.

They’re women

There are around 100,000 multiple sclerosis sufferers in the UK1. In fact it’s one of the five most common critical illnesses claimed for2. What’s more, it affects twice as many women as men1.

 Multiple sclerosis is also very difficult to diagnose.

That’s why many providers use the standard definition from the Association of British Insurers to make decisions on a claim.

But at Bright Grey their definition of multiple sclerosis is better than that and means you don’t have to wait as long for your diagnosis to be confirmed3.

1 in 9 of all women’s critical illness claims were for multiple sclerosis2

81%   of the women who claimed for multiple sclerosis were 40 or younger2

65,000 women in the UK have been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis1

Sources: 1. www.mssociety.org.uk, May 2012. 2. Bright Grey claims statistics, 1 July – 31 December 2011. 3. This improved definition applies to menu plans with a quote effective date of 28 May 2012 or later.

So, if you’re thinking about critical illness cover, choose an insurer that acts sooner rather than later to help multiple sclerosis sufferers.

Talk to Park Gate. We’ll help you identify your individual protection needs and guide you through the various types of cover available to make sure you get the right cover at the right price. Call 01489 580020 or email info@parkgate.net

 

A disease in which the fatty layers around nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord are damaged. It affects the ability of nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord to communicate with each other which can lead to a deterioration of senses and the ability to control movement.

A rare, degenerative neurological disorder caused by cell loss in certain areas of the central nervous system. Its main symptoms include tremor and reduced movements similar to Parkinson’s disease but it has additional problems leading to a distinct diagnosis separate from Parkinson’s disease.

Surgery where the chest is cut open through the breast bone for the purpose of correcting a structural abnormality of the heart or performing a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG).

Loss of muscle function and voluntary movement of a leg or arm.

Parkinson’s disease is a progressive, degenerative disorder of the central nervous system which mainly affects movement but can also lead to behavioural problems and dementia.

An increase in blood pressure in the pulmonary (lung) artery or vein which is of unknown origin. This can lead to lung damage or heart failure

Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a rare, degenerative brain disease which involves gradual deterioration or death of cells in certain areas of the brain. Its main symptoms include tremor and reduced movements similar to Parkinson’s disease but it has additional problems leading to a distinct diagnosis separate from Parkinson’s disease.